Saturday, July 27, 2013

whats hot 4.3 jelly beans

As expected, Google officially confirmed Android 4.3 at its event on Wednesday with Android chief Sundar Pichai. Rolling out the updates to its pet devices, user like me are now able to see 4.3 in action in our devices since this friday. Among the new features/improvements in the update are a redesigned camera interface, Bluetooth Low Energy support, performance improvements such as smoother animations, and multi-user restricted profiles. But there’s apparently something else that Google didn’t talk about. Android Police has unearthed a hidden app permissions manager that allows users to selectively disable certain permissions for apps.


New Camera UI


Android 4.3 also offers a new updated Camera app that features a new arch based menu which makes it easier to control and switch camera settings.

Bluetooth Low Energy support



You may not know it, but a whole new family of Bluetooth devices have been arriving. What makes them different from their predecessors is Bluetooth Smart Ready. These are designed as sensors. So, for example, one might check if all windows are locked, while another might measure your heart rate. You get the idea.

Android 4.3  features some Bluetooth updates that let you pair an Android device with low-power gadgets like these sensors. During Google's presentation, we saw an Android device connecting with a Bluetooth Smart-enabled heart-rate monitor that was being powered by the popular Runtastic fitness app.

The update also came with Bluetooth AVRCP 1.3 support, which lets your device now transmit metadata, like a song's title and artist, to Bluetooth controllers.

In Android 4.3, with application programming interface (API) support for Bluetooth Generic Attribute Profile (GATT) services, you can create Android apps that will support these devices. This represents a new and potentially very profitable market for Android developers and their Bluetooth hardware partners.



Multi-user restricted profiles

The biggest addition to Android 4.3 is the Multi-User Restricted Profiles feature, which lets you control the usage of apps and other content on a user level. Multiple user profiles were already available in 4.2.2, but the ability to create restrictions has long been requested, so it's sure to be a big hit.
This feature is for users who have kids. Android has allowed you to have multiple users for some time now, but with this version you can finally have restricted profiles. Technically, it means that you can set up separate environments for each user with fine-grained restrictions in the apps that are available in those environments. Keep junior out of your, ah, questionable apps or Web sites. 
Each restricted profile offers an isolated and secure space with its own local storage, home screens, widgets, and settings. Unlike with users, profiles are created from the tablet owner’s environment, based on the owner’s installed apps and system accounts. The owner controls which installed apps are enabled in the new profile, and access to the owner’s accounts is disabled by default

 Open GL ES 3.0

A big deal for gamers, Open GL ES 3.0 makes the new version of Android more efficient and just plain better at displaying graphics. Google's demo showed us impressive textures, lens flares, and reflections that the older OS would have had trouble displaying. While the upgraded graphics might be indiscernible to the average user, Open GL ES support is still important because of the new possibilities it opens up for developers. Game developers can now take advantage of OpenGL ES 3.0 and EGL extensions as standard features of Android, with access from either framework or native APIs.

New media capabilities

A modular DRM framework enables media application developers to more easily integrate DRM into their own streaming protocols such as MPEG DASH. Apps can also access a built-in VP8 encoder from framework or native APIs for high-quality video capture.

Notification access

Your apps can now access and interact with the stream of status bar notifications as they are posted. You can display them in any way you want, including routing them to nearby Bluetooth devices, and you can update and dismiss notifications as needed.

Improved profiling tools


 New tags in the Systrace tool and on-screen GPU profiling give you new ways to build great performance into your app.

Permission Manager

There is an app available in the Google Play Store called “Permission Manager” and installing this will grant you access to the App Ops functionality. The real question will be whether you want and/or need access to App Ops. For that, read on to see just what can be done using it. In short, App Ops will allow you to set permissions based on individual apps.


Notification Access
People love those notifications at the top of their Android display. I know I do. I'm constantly checking them. Until this new version of Android appeared developers couldn't access this data stream. Now they can. That is, if you, the user, allow them to.
What developers can do is register a notification listener service that, with your blessing, will receive all the data notifications when they're displayed in the status bar. Developers can then launch applications or services for a new class of "smart" apps.
Better Digital Rights Management (DRM)
Google has also added new media DRM framework APIs and improved the existing ones to provide  an integrated set of services for managing licensing and provisioning, accessing low-level codecs, and decoding encrypted media data.
The net effect of these changes is it will make DRM easier to manage and it should make video streams with DRM, which are pretty much all of them these days, look and play better. Like I said, Google is making the best of an annoying commercial video necessity.
OK, go ahead and boo. I know you want too. I hate DRM too. But, here's the painful truth, DRM is here to stay and we might as well try to make the best of it.
That's exactly what Google has done with its new modular DRM framework. This will enable developers to more easily integrate DRM into their own streaming protocols such as MPEG Dynamic Adaptive Streaming over HTTP (DASH) (PDF Link).

Keyboard & input

Android 4.3 comes with an upgraded algorithm for tap-typing recognition that makes text input easier while chatting via messages or even while composing emails. It also brings a new emoji keyboard, which we've previously seen in iOS. The update also adds lower latency input for gamepad buttons and joysticks.